Growth and growth policy

Low Interest Rate Policy Cripples the Economy and Reduces Prosperity

Japan’s low interest rate policy began 30 years ago, about 15 years earlier than in the EU. But three decades of low interest rate policy meant three lost decades for Japan. In an interview with Stefan Beig, economist Gunther Schnabl explains why the low interest rate policy is so damaging to prosperity.

How Climate Fears Can Rake in Billions

The decision of the German Constitutional Court on climate policy is presumptuous and far removed from reality. But conservatives and liberals alike are applauding it, because the fear of global catastrophe opens up an inexhaustible source of money.

No More Growth—And Happiness Is Just Around The Corner

Critics of growth call for zero growth or even “degrowth”. Their fears are based on economic misconceptions and a failure to recognize the capitalist dynamic of decoupling growth from resource consumption. Moreover, they fail to recognize the needs of poor countries.

For Eurozone Countries, the Problem Is Not So Much the Coronavirus, but Italy

The Italian people are hardworking, noble, and clever but held back by their own decadent institutions. With no end in sight, this mess hurts the entire European monetary union. It would be better for Italy and the other eurozone nations if Italy had an orderly departure from the euro.

The Entrepreneur’s Responsibility Is to Succeed as an Entrepreneur

From a “man of the church” one usually expects (besides friendly praise for the work of the entrepreneur) the admonition that entrepreneurs should not merely strive for profit, but always

Inequality is Shrinking: Branko Milanović Disagrees with Oxfam

Every year the Oxfam report makes sensational headlines. The tenor: global inequality is increasing. 26 billionaires would own as much as the 3.8 billion poorest people in the world. Leading inequality specialist Branko Milanović unmasks Oxfam’s alarmism as misleading.

On the Abuse of Monetary Policy

The euro has been a political project since its inception. That is why the independence of the European Central Bank was also in danger from the outset. In the end, it always came down to the alternative “Cambridge or Vienna” or, rather, “Keynes or Hayek.” The option for Keynes led to an increasing politicization of monetary policy in the European Monetary Union.

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